Orchidaceae
Acacallis cyanea

 

The genus Acacallis has only one species; it differs from other genera in several ways, from its unusual column to its blue flower. John Lindley named it after Akakallis, a Greek nymph and Apollo's lover. It occurs in Part of Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela.

Sheehan, T & M (1994) An illustrated survey of Orchid Genera. Timber Press Inc 421 p.


 

Bifrenaria sp.

 

Bifrenaria is a South American genus of Orchidaceae comprising ca. 20 species, which are characterized by four-angled, unifoliate pseudobulbs, plicate leaves, and flowers bearing a conspicuous spur and a forked stipe (1). The name of this genus refers to the two-stalked pollinia, which are masses of pollen grains bound together by viscin threads (2). The majority of the species grow in southern Brazil as epiphytes in the Atlantic rain forest and, less frequently, as rupicolous plants in the Brazilian ‘campos rupestres’ vegetation (1).

(1) Koehler, S, Williams, NH, Whitten, WM, do Carmo E. do Amaral, M (2002) Phylogeny of the Bifrenaria (Orchidaceae) Complex Based on Morphology and Sequence Data from Nuclear rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS) and Chloroplast trnL-trnF Region. International Journal of Plant Sciences 163; 1055–1066

(2) Sheehan, T & M (1994) An illustrated survey of Orchid Genera. Timber Press Inc 421 p.

 

 

Brassavola martiana
The flowers of Brassavola are moth-pollinated and generally borne at the apex of the pseudobulb, either singly or on a simple inflorescence up to 12 flowers.

Sheehan, T & M (1994) An illustrated survey of Orchid Genera. Timber Press Inc 421 p.

 

Bulbophyllum sp.

 

Bulbophyllum is a myophilous, pantropical orchid genus containing over 1000 species, most of them found in Asia, while about 55 species occur in Brazil.

Teixeira Sde P, Borba EL, Semir J (2004) Lip anatomy and its implications for the pollination mechanisms of Bulbophyllum species (Orchidaceae). Ann Bot (Lond) 93(5): 499-505. Epub 2004 Mar 5

 

Cattleya sp.

 

The first Cattleya were introduced to England in 1818 as a protective outer wrapping for some mosses and lichens from Brazil (1). The form of the Cattleya, with its large lip, is typical of the bee-flower in the orchids (2).

(1) Sheehan, T & M (1994) An illustrated survey of Orchid Genera. Timber Press Inc 421 p.

(2) Parrotta, JA (1995) Trees of the Tapajós; A photographic field guide. USDA Forest Service. 370 p.

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