Apocynaceae
Ambelania acida • Pepino
The fruit of the Pepino is locally eaten raw or as a jam. In order to remove its abundant latex, a slice is cut off the top of the fruit and the exocarp is then beaten with the blade of a knife to release the latex from the pericarp (1). The fruits are also part of the diet of for example squirrel monkeys (2).

(1) Local guides at Amazonat, personal communication

(2) Stone, AI (2006) Foraging Ontogeny is not Linked to Delayed Maturation in Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). Ethology 112: 105

 

Couma spp • Sorva
Sorva (Couma spp.) is known in South-America for its exudates (1). The latex of several species of Couma is used medicinally (2).

(1) IPGRI (2000-2006) Challenges in managing forest genetic resources for livelihoods - Examples from Argentina and Brazil; Chapter 3, Vantomme, P, Extraction of nonwood forest
Products.

(2) Mors, WB, Rizzini, CT and Pereira, NA (2000) Medicinal Plants of Brazil. Reference Publications Inc: 501 p.

 

Himatanthus sucuuba • Sucuuba

The bark and latex of the Sucuuba tree have several medicinal applications in Brazil (1,2,3). Results of a recent study suggest that cinnamates are responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of Himatanthus sucuuba used in popular medicine (4). 

(1) Mors, WB, Rizzini, CT and Pereira, NA (2000) Medicinal Plants of Brazil. Reference Publications Inc: 501 p.

(2) Castner, JL, Timme, SL and Duke, JA (1998) A field guide to Medicinal and Useful Plants of the Upper Amazon. 154 p.

(3) Parrotta, JA (1995) Trees of the Tapajós; A photographic field guide. USDA Forest Service. 370 p.

(4) Miranda, de, ALP, Silva, JRA, Rezende, CM, Neves, JS, Parrini, SC, Pinheiro, MLB, Cordeiro, MC, Tamborini, E, Pinto, AC (2000) Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of the Latex Containing Triterpenes from Himatanthus sucuuba. Planta med 66: 284-286

 

Aspidosperma spp. • Carapanauba

At least two species of Aspidosperma are referred to as carapanauba: Aspidosperma nitidum and Aspidosperma excelsum. The bark of carapanauba is known for various medicinal applications, which is probably related to the types and quantities of the alkaloids it contains (1,2,3,4,5). Few of its alkaloids have been identified and studied so far (1,2).

(1) Pereira, MM, C. Alcântara, de, AF, Piló-Veloso, D, Raslanb, DS (2006) NMR Structural Analysis of #Braznitidumine: A New Indole Alkaloid with 1,2,9-Triazabicyclo [7.2.1] System, Isolated from Aspidosperma nitidum (Apocynaceae). J Braz Chem Soc

(2) Verpoorte R, Kos-Kuyck E, Tsoi AT, Ruigrok CL, de Jong G, Baerheim Svendsen A (1983) Medicinal plants of surinam. III: Antimicrobially active alkaloids from Aspidosperma excelsum. Planta Med. 48(4): 283-9

(3) Mors, WB, Rizzini, CT and Pereira, NA (2000) Medicinal Plants of Brazil. Reference Publications Inc: 501 p.

(4) Estrella, E (1995) Plantas Medicinales Amazonicas: Realidad y Perspectivas. TCA: 302 p.

(5) Local guides at Amazonat, personal communication

 

Plumeria sp. • Jasmine de Cayenne

 

Species of the genus Plumeria are common ornamentals with a range of floral colours and scents.  In addition, its various parts are used in traditional medicine (1,2).  Some of its properties are likely to be due to iridoid compounds (2,3).

(1) Mors, WB, Rizzini, CT and Pereira, NA (2000) Medicinal Plants of Brazil. Reference Publications Inc: 501 p.

(2) Grignon-Dubois, M, Bernadette Rezzonico, B, Usubillaga, A, Vojas, LB (2005) Isolation of plumieride from Plumeria inodora. Chemistry of Natural Compounds 41

(3) Elsässer, B, Krohn, K, Akhtar, MN, Flörke, U, Kouam, SF, Kuigoua, MG, Ngadjui, BT, Abegaz, BM, Antus, S, Kurtán, T (2005) Revision of the Absolute Configuration of Plumericin and Isoplumericin from Plumeria rubra. Chemistry & Biodiversity 2: 799 - 808